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Visa fullständig version : Swedish elections


2006-08-08, 11:58
Hi,



How is the Swedish Pirate Party facing the upcoming elections? What are its expectatives? How does the electoral count works in Sweden and how many votes are needed to obtain a representative?



It would be good that you write short updates (I think you won't have much free time) on the election to see how it is going (kind of blog for foreign readers).



Good luck, Pirates!!

pululante
2006-08-08, 12:21
This post is mine... :D

Nicklas W Bjurman
2006-08-08, 14:10
We expect success... Of course we do expect success one needs to be positive and considering how much positivity one is faced with when one do hear from people I think we can do it.



To get seats in the Riksdag(Swedish parlament) one needs 4% of the votes or around 225000 votes if we have the same amount of participiners as last time it was election.

larsl
2006-08-08, 14:49
Nicklas W Bjurman (2006-Aug-08)

To get seats in the Riksdag(Swedish parlament) one needs 4% of the votes or around 225000 votes if we have the same amount of participiners as last time it was election.

4% of the total votes, or 12% of the votes in a single electoral district. The former is of course both more plausible and more desirable.

SM5POR
2006-08-08, 15:04
Nicklas W Bjurman (2006-Aug-08)To get seats in the Riksdag(Swedish parlament) one needs 4% of the votes or around 225000 votes if we have the same amount of participiners as last time it was election.

To further clarify the situation, the election law defines 4 percent as the minimum portion of the national vote a party must win in order to participate in the distribution of seats at all.



However, there are 349 seats in the parliament, and they are distributed among eligible parties in proportion to their respective vote counts, meaning that when a party has received just above 4 percent, they will immediately be given around 14 seats, not merely one seat. It's thus difficult to enter the parliament, but once you are in, you have quite a lot of influence.



And as the parliament seats today are fairly evenly divided between "left" (189 seats) and "right" (158 seats), where the majority for the "left" currently allows them to form the government, a new party stands a good chance of being able to shift the balance of power, if it wants to. It simply requires each of the existing blocs to obtain 174 or fewer seats in the election. Opinion polls now suggest it will be a close run between the two blocs, the Pirate Party not considered. You do the math...



The Pirate Party therefore does not take a position with respect to traditional left-right-issues in Sweden, but rather promotes its three-issue agenda (which in reality is quite broad anyway) to be able to attract voters from both sides of the Swedish political spectrum, and will then vote for the government which gives the Pirate Party the best offer on these three issues. On all other issues, the Pirate Party intends to vote with the government they have chosen.



You may note that 189 plus 158 adds up to 347 rather than 349. This is because two members of parliament, who were elected on the ballots of the Left Party in 2002, have since left :) the Left Party, and now remain in parliament as independents. Unless they get elected on the ballot of some other party this year, they won't remain in parliament after September 17.



The Election Authority provides further information on the Swedish electoral system (http://www.val.se/in_english/index.html) in English.

SM5POR
2006-08-08, 15:29
larsl (2006-Aug-08)4% of the total votes, or 12% of the votes in a single electoral district.

To use the proper terminology, the 12-percent rule applies to the vote in a single constituency ("valkrets"). There are 29 constituencies in Sweden, but nearly 6,000 electoral districts ("valdistrikt"). It's important to be able to tell the difference when you study the tables with election results (http://www.val.se/in_english/previous_elections/index.html).



I believe the 12-percent rule was introduced with the single-chamber parliament in 1970. It has never been invoked once; no party has ever won only a single seat in parliament thanks to enjoying a regional stronghold, although there are regional differencies between the parties (the left-bloc parties are strong in the far north, while the Christian Democrats has a local stronghold in Jönköping County in the south).