handdator

Visa fullständig version : Ideas on getting the message across


2006-08-15, 09:53
The message that IP law is drastically wrong needs to get out beyond the aware few to the masses that currently don't know, and don't really care about the tight grip that a few conglomerates have over the realm of intellectual property.



How can this be done? Certainly good media coverage helps, especially if you can do something that creates an interesting talking point. The peaceful protest of The Pirate Bay certainly helped with this, but more clearly needs to be done to generate awareness to a wider group.



While having a political party is a great idea, perhaps other ways of influencing political opinion could be used? Maybe lobbying politicians who might be receptive to the message could be a good idea?



Also - may I suggest that a good point of entry might just be the BBC in the UK? They're having all sorts of problems trying to negotiate the tangled web of IP law as they try to roll out their new services online, and on TV & Radio, and as a public-service broadcaster would be an ideal role-model for IP law change if they could be persuaded into realising that they have the power to make change, and indeed should do so.



--



keep up the good work, btw!

SM5POR
2006-08-16, 00:02
Anonymous (2006-Aug-15)While having a political party is a great idea, perhaps other ways of influencing political opinion could be used? Maybe lobbying politicians who might be receptive to the message could be a good idea?

The Pirate Party isn't involved with lobbying existing politicians to change their minds, but rather with nominating its own politicians for election, pre-lobbied!



A member of parliament is not an empty shell waiting to be given an agenda to push, but rather has an agenda already. Besides the questionable effectiveness of spending lobbying efforts on politicians affiliated with other parties, I'm concerned about the ethical aspect of convincing an elected politician to do something he wasn't elected to do.



If I'm pro-abortion and vote for a candidate running on a pro-abortion ballot, will I be happy to see a paid lobbyist make him change his mind just before a pro-abortion bill is tabled in parliament? Obviously not, and I surely won't vote for such a "receptive" politician in the next election, regardless of whether the bill gets voted through or not.



Few politicians maintain strong positions on the issues of intellectual propery and privacy, and while they may indeed be receptive to lobbying in those areas (as has already been proven by the entertainment industry), their top priority is not to listen to the best informed lobbyists, but to listen to their voters. If the entertainment industry won't nullify our efforts by even more intense pro-copyright campaigns, the voters surely will by telling them about more important issues than copyright.



Instead, this receptiveness of theirs is best exploited by other politicians, belonging to a different party and sitting in a bargaining position with respect to the formation of a government.



Ideally, the elected politicians represent their voters. A lobbyist represents somebody else, but not the voters. We don't represent anyone else; we represent ourselves, and we are the voters, wherefore we elect our own politicians, rather than hire yet another lobbyist to compete with ourselves for the attention of the politicians.



Also - may I suggest that a good point of entry might just be the BBC in the UK? They're having all sorts of problems trying to negotiate the tangled web of IP law as they try to roll out their new services online, and on TV & Radio, and as a public-service broadcaster would be an ideal role-model for IP law change if they could be persuaded into realising that they have the power to make change, and indeed should do so.

That sounds like a good approach, but I think this is something the UK Pirate Party is best equipped to do (maybe that's what you meant). They know their laws better than we do, and they know the BBC. If the UK Pirate Party wants foreign assistance, I'm sure their Swedish counterpart will support them, but they should at least provide their own public face in dealing with the BBC and with the British public.

Snild Dolkow
2006-08-16, 15:03
There already is a pirate lobbying organisation, Piratbyrån (check them out at wikipedia, for example, or Google it). They've made a huge difference for the pirate movement in Sweden. One might even say they started the whole pirate activism.



However, as much as they've done, they have not been able to make the politicians listen to us and understand our concerns. It's hard to fight for a politician's attention when there are lobbyists from the other side with vast resources.



Piratbyrån recently started The Pro Piracy Lobby (http://propiracy.org/) among with some other pirate organisations.

2006-08-16, 16:58
While I support the moral stand and ethical foundations of your arguements - purely from a marketing point of view (it's what I do) choosing a name containing the word 'Pirate' for a political organization is surely going to hinder your progress.



Getting the word out to the uneducated masses is hard enough, but choosing a label that will make you sound like a group of extremists is going to make it that much harder.



Either way, I hope you manage to prove me wrong and enjoy great success.



;)

SM5POR
2006-08-16, 17:11
Anonymous (2006-Aug-16)While I support the moral stand and ethical foundations of your arguements - purely from a marketing point of view (it's what I do) choosing a name containing the word 'Pirate' for a political organization is surely going to hinder your progress.

Seven months' experience suggests it's the other way around - even if the label "pirate" has bad connotations in the view of the general public, its unexpected appearance in connection with a political party and an election campaign makes people look closer rather than shy away, and when they still fail to find any blood or firearms, much of those bad connotations simply evaporate.



In comparison, initiatives such as the "Internet Party" have been sitting around unnoticed for much longer. If you appear neither dangerous nor important, why would anyone care about you?

2006-08-16, 22:19
Well good for you guys, like I said I hope you enjoy continued success, but I do have one request, if you do get in and keep your pirate name - can I have a musket and a dagger? :w00t: