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Visa fullständig version : Don't be scared off by the subject description


Björn Felten
2006-01-29, 16:20
Albeit it's highly unlikely that you have a Pirate Party in your country yet, maybe it's time you get one?



Rest assured, there is a huge potential for creating one yourself! Millions upon millions of people all over the world, have come to realize, that today's laws on Intellectual Property Rights has long ago passed the limit where society's benefit overshadows the drawbacks of today's laws. We only have to read about the HIV medicines to realize that it's not even an economic question any more, it's even a matter of life and death.



So please, do what you can to spread the message: The citizens of Planet Earth will no longer tolerate that a handful of multibillion dollar companies set up the rules. Intellectual achievements are, and has always been, a part of our cultural inheritance.



This will grow into a global revolt against the oligopolies of this world, make no mistake about it. Just make sure that you help us in our effort, because all alone we here in Sweden can never make it happen, it's only with the cooperation with our friends all over the world that we can make a difference!

Jouni Snellman
2006-02-13, 14:06
Excellent, this is what the world needs and deserves! However, establishing a political party from scratch is a lot of work for those with jobs. Besides, I am not sure if it is the right approach for all countries.



How do you like the sound of "The European Piracy Initiative"? It´s a think tank and a political organisation where there are no members yet. As there can be no monopolies on words and trade names, I guess we can say that the founding meeting has been held and the establishment procedure completed. What do you think? ; )



Jouni Snellman

Helsinki

Richie
2006-02-13, 16:11
Jouni Snellman (2006-Feb-13)How do you like the sound of "The European Piracy Initiative"?

Sounds like a plan. There are a lot of existing initiatives, policy and lobbying groups, think tanks and other organisations all over Europe concerned with consumer's rights and personal integrity as well as patent and copyright issues. I think we need some kind of cohesive factor, gathering all these people into one powerful force.



We've got the EDRI, FFII, BEUC the list just goes on and on...



http://www.edri.org/

http://www.ffii.org/

http://www.beuc.org/

http://www.consumersdigitalrights.org/

Björn Felten
2006-02-13, 17:49
Jouni Snellman (2006-Feb-13) However, establishing a political party from scratch is a lot of work for those with jobs.

Indeed it is, and Sweden is probably one of the worst democracies in the world when it comes to protecting the established parties and preventing new ones to form.



But do not underestimate the power of the internet! We've already proved that it can be done even in Sweden with nothing but dedication to throw into the pot. A recent poll on the Swedish newspaper Aftonbladet's web site shows that 70% of everyone that answered the question -- regardless of age and sex! -- could very well consider voting for the Pirate Party.



How do you like the sound of "The European Piracy Initiative"?

Well, to tell you the truth I personally am not all that happy with the Pirate concept. The reason we use it in our name is more or less to give the media industry the finger. They've been wrongfully compared everyone that questions their right to various intellectual ownerships to thieves and pirates.



I would rather prefer something like "The Global Initiative To Protect Intellectual Freedom And Personal Integrity" if it hadn't been far to long... :cool:

John Nilsson
2006-02-13, 18:29
Personally I see this just as a small seed of another movement. It's like 'cyberpunks' has matured into the inernet citizens of the digital millenium and are now demanding the rest of the world to recoginize this and follow us into the future.



Pardon my rambling, I haven't yet found the words for this feeling but I think it's there somwhere between the lines.



So a name based on piracy my be a ship to small to fit in.

Jouni Snellman
2006-02-13, 21:55
I´m with Hugi, piracy is better than "intellectual freedom" which sounds like something from the Soviet Constitution. Sir Francis Drake is a great hero in England but in the French history books he is a pirate. If the British Navy had not been clever enough to outsource many of its operations to pirate captains, Britannia would never have ruled the seas. Many ships had both the Union Jack and the Skull & Bones flag on board and used them on a case by case basis.

Jouni Snellman
2006-02-14, 09:19
Never underestimate the speed of the internet. However, emails and surfing the net will not get you very far in terms of political power.



The European Piracy Initiative

http://europirates.livejournal.com/



"IPRs are (...) a moral, ecological and cultural outrage, (...) a sophisticated name for modern piracy."



Vandana Shiva

Warlock
2006-02-28, 13:32
The same situation in Italy. We need a strong "pirate" movement in Europe.



Warlock

Findeton
2006-03-02, 14:38
HI, I'm spanish and I think that if the pirate party existed here, many people would vote it... but it doesn't exist and they are always limitating freedom a little bit more, and always with the support of every politician here. It's just outrageous.



I'm seeking information on the steps that must be followed to setup the new party... perhaps I'll eventually muster up enough strengh to follow the steps!

Björn Felten
2006-03-03, 23:26
Findeton (2006-Mar-02)HI, I'm spanish and I think that if the pirate party existed here, many people would vote it...

I'm sure that's true for almost every country. The established politicians tend to focus on the same old issues over and over again. A few percent more or less money to things that people really don't care much about, while ignoring the most important stuff: Quality Of Life.



You, as well as everyone else, should be able to use internet the way we've done here in Sweden to try to launch the same revolution we are about to have.



Whatever support you need, rest assured that we will give it to you. Because, as we all know, one country alone cannot make this revolution happen. It takes the cooperation by a majority of countries before we can bring the mighty, global media industry and it's powerful lobbying groups, as well as the established political parties, on it's knees. They are not likely to give up their power without a fight.

Findeton
2006-03-06, 22:49
Hi another time, I've been been a little busy making friends with articles, titles, sections, and chapters and I have to conclude that it's not necessary to pay anything to found a spanish Pirate Party, or to start a wirting campaing, we just need 3 signatures to setup the party and enter on the Register of Political Parties doing some paperwork, a statute etc. And, in order to run for the general elections that are going to take place in 2008, we just need to have already registered the party and presented a list of candidates for congress and/or senate. As easy as that.



Now we've gathered some of the legal requirements, we'll keep filling the legal gaps. We've already started the work to get a functional webpage, and I we'll start to openly contact the people concerned of our surroundings (like Jorge Cortell and David Bravo, for example) and associations (i.e. Asociación de Internautas) soon. We're also trying to learn from how you founded the party, so we'll search as many pieces of news related to you in spanish and english as possible, but we'd very much appreciate any other piece of information. And btw thanks for the support, I really appreciate it and I'm sure it will come in handy soon.



I've also translated 'Principles 3.0' to spanish and the text from the web and sent an email with them to you, I hope you'll find it useful for the webpage.



I also would like someone to explain what is the money you are colleting for (sorry but I just don't know swedish :p ). And, I don't want to get too much polemic here, but I was wondering why you didn't choose to pursue the use of free software in the public administration, I guess you decided that it would be a controversial aim for some of your advocates. Perhaps it's related with why you decided to use a 'privative' (as Richard Stallman would say) package for the setup of the webpage ;)



Good night and good luck!

Björn Felten
2006-03-07, 16:07
Findeton (2006-Mar-06)I've been been a little busy making friends with articles, titles, sections, and chapters

Well done! Keep up the good work, you hear!



I've also translated 'Principles 3.0' to spanish and the text from the web and sent an email with them to you, I hope you'll find it useful for the webpage.

Now, that is really good news. We desperately need translations to all the big languages of our globe (German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, &c) so that the message can get out to the entire world.



I also would like someone to explain what is the money you are colleting for (sorry but I just don't know swedish :p ).

Well, as I've said before, not knowing Swedish makes you belong to a 99.9% majority of our world, so no hard feelings for that.



The money we need is for printing the voting bills (a piece of paper with a party name, and usually also the names of the party's representatives, that we put in an envelope and "post" on election day). Only a few (four this year) companies are allowed to print those bills, and they cost about 3 Euro per 1000. With something like six million voters in Sweden, this means we need several millions of those bills to give every voter the opportunity to vote for us. We also have to distribute those bills to every one of thousands of voting halls by ourselves.



All of this is of course taken care of (for free -- e.g. paid for by the tax payers) for the established parties, it's just yet another way of keeping new parties out of our Riksdag (parliament).



And, I don't want to get too much polemic here, but I was wondering why you didn't choose to pursue the use of free software in the public administration,

That's actually a very good question, that's been raised in several places of our forum. The short answer is, that we think that commercial and free alternatives should be able to compete on equal terms. And in this case the commercial alternative won. :cool:

Rick Falkvinge
2006-03-07, 19:13
Björn Felten (2006-Mar-07)
And, I don't want to get too much polemic here, but I was wondering why you didn't choose to pursue the use of free software in the public administration,
That's actually a very good question, that's been raised in several places of our forum. The short answer is, that we think that commercial and free alternatives should be able to compete on equal terms. And in this case the commercial alternative won. :cool:

Actually, we do strongly encourage free software. Check this section of our principles:

Principles 3.0Whenever the publicly funded sector procures information systems or produces information itself, it must actively counteract the formation or continuation of these private monopolies on information, knowledge, ideas, or concepts.

Björn Felten
2006-03-07, 19:29
Rick Falkvinge (2006-Mar-07)Actually, we do strongly encourage free software.

Of coure we do. But in this case it seems that the commercial alternative picked the longest straw.

SM5POR
2006-03-10, 21:30
Findeton (2006-Mar-06)Hi another time, I've been been a little busy making friends with articles, titles, sections, and chapters and I have to conclude that it's not necessary to pay anything to found a spanish Pirate Party, or to start a wirting campaing, we just need 3 signatures to setup the party and enter on the Register of Political Parties doing some paperwork, a statute etc. And, in order to run for the general elections that are going to take place in 2008, we just need to have already registered the party and presented a list of candidates for congress and/or senate. As easy as that.

I consider articles, titles, sections and chapters a great source of intellectual enjoyment! And they may be copied freely as well! :D



Compared to the 1,500 signatures required for registering a party in Sweden, a mere three signatures sounds like a pure formality. On the other hand, any party can participate in a Swedish election even without registering; the down side of doing so is that some other group may order ballots with your party name printed on them, distribute them, and have themselves unintentionally voted in by your supporters (who didn't bother to check the list of candidate names printed on the ballot).



We may just as well consider joining forces in preparation for the 2009 elections to the European Parliament. However, that has currently low priority up here, as all resources have to be aimed at an election only six months away.



I understand that some of the autonomous regions in Spain have their own legislatures. Do they make laws in the fields of intellectual property or privacy as well, or are those things decided in Madrid alone, for all of Spain?

tempuser
2006-03-25, 06:03
Hi, I came across this site today and I won't stay long (that's why "tempuser") but I wanted to share and learn a little before I move on.



It seems to me that the Green Party is your natural ally, in the European Parliament and maybe specifically in Sweden too. Let me know if I am wrong about this, but I think I have good reason to say this.



The Greens have opposed software patents in the EU, and generally hold a stance against any increases of "intellectual property rights."



quoting from http://www.greenparty.org.uk/news/2166

"Intellectual Property is deeply biased in favour of powerful and unaccountable rights-holders - who aren't required to bear the people in mind. In the UK, excessive Intellectual Property Rights prevent access to and dissemination of vast areas of knowledge."



It's true they aren't actively campaigning for the abolition of copyright, but then I'll bet they won't get in your way on this issue anyway. I couldn't find any info in the English section of http://www.mp.se/ though. Anyone from the Pirate Party tried networking with the Swedish Greens yet? They might have some good advice for your campaigns, if they're willing to reach out...



Also it seems like a good idea for anyone outside of Sweden who wants to promote "Pirate Values" but is daunted by the huge task of starting a political party, should show up at their local Green Party meetings and push the issues to the Greens. In my experience with the Green Party of the United States, they are happy to discuss if you make the case from the perspective that patents/IP functions to shaft the poor and restrict power to the already powerful.

SM5POR
2006-03-26, 20:50
tempuser (2006-Mar-25)It seems to me that the Green Party is your natural ally, in the European Parliament and maybe specifically in Sweden too. Let me know if I am wrong about this, but I think I have good reason to say this.

I essentially agree with your observation, but it doesn't rule out other allies as well. I think it's still a little early to discuss allies in the European Parliament for the 2009 elections.



As for the Swedish Greens (Miljöpartiet), they have a lot of other issues on their agenda, and while the Pirate Party could certainly work with them, the Greens currently form part of the parliamentary support to keep the Social Democrats in power, i.e. the very same government that has given strong support to both the CII (Computer-Implemented Inventions) and the Data Retention directives. The Social Democrats will have to make a 180-degree turn on both those issues (and give current Minister of Justice Thomas Bodström the boot) to gain Pirate Party support; a rather unlikely scenario.



Among current opposition parties in Sweden, the Centre Party looks like the best option for the Pirate Party to cooperate with. In the European Parliament, the Centre Party has one seat (Lena Ek) in the ALDE group.

tempuser
2006-03-30, 09:55
Thanks for the informative reply. I didn't realize the Swedish Greens were in the government. So they probably won't be helping you get elected.

SM5POR
2006-03-30, 10:43
tempuser (2006-Mar-30)I didn't realize the Swedish Greens were in the government.

Technically the Greens aren't in the government, as they don't hold any positions in the cabinet of ministers, which is entirely composed of Social Democrats. The Greens differ considerably in opinion from the Social Democrats on a number of issues, such as foreign policy and the European Union (when the Greens were voted into the parliament in 1994, they did so largely thanks to their opposition to Sweden joining the EU, but they couldn't stop it from happening).



Still, the Social Democrats don't control a majority of seats in the parliament, and therefore they have to rely on the support of other parties. As they have done before, they made a deal with the Greens and with the Left (former Communist) Party rather than allow the centre/liberal/christian democrat/moderate conservative bloc to form the government (those four parties would have needed support from the Greens as well, but in the end the Greens preferred to support the Social Democrats instead).



So they probably won't be helping you get elected.

In a way they may be unintentionally doing just that, as they are now generally regarded as supporters of "leftish" governments, while at the same time not being a very reliable supporter (the Greens have frequently and publicly assumed positions running counter to government policy). This has left a small political vacuum where the Greens once started out, as a bloc neutral group concerned with a rather precise set of issues (in their case, environmental issues). The Pirate Party is running on an agenda strictly limited to privacy protection and general access to and sharing of culture, while not taking any position on the distribution of taxes or similar issues.



If the Pirate Party gets voted in, they just might ride the balance of power between the two blocs, allowing them to tip the scale in favour of the government that offers them the best deal, just as the Greens once did. I think this will be an interesting election, not to speak of the negotiations that may follow...